Many educators are feeling good about their golden years.

Researchers at AIG VALIC, Houston, an arm of American International Group Inc., New York, have published data on teachers’ feelings about retirement planning in a summary of results of a recent survey of 1,988 U.S. adults ages 45 to 65.

The teachers in the sample are expecting defined benefit pension plans to replace 24% of their working household income, and they also seem to be a doing good job of contributing to other retirement savings vehicles, the researchers report.

Only 56% of the non-teachers in the survey sample said they save money for retirement each month, only 19% are working with a professional advisor, and only 13% are developing a financial plan for retirement, the researchers report.

Meanwhile, 65% of the teachers said they save for retirement each month, 34% are working with a professional advisor, and 26% are developing a retirement plan.

Only about 8% of the participants who said they feel prepared for retirement have financial advisors, while 36% of the participants with advisors said they feel prepared, the researchers report.

About 61% of all participants said they fear post-retirement health care costs a great deal, and 45% said they would be willing to work a few extra years for coverage or go back to work after retirement for health coverage, the researchers report.

The researchers also found that 38% of the participants would consider staying at jobs they did not like to keep their health coverage.