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5 Worst States for Working-Age Deaths This Year (So Far)

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COVID-19 continued to be a menace in the first half of this year for advisors who were trying to help working-age clients fine-tune life insurance and retirement planning arrangements.

The change in the number of deaths of people ages 25 through 64 ranged from a decrease of 2.5%, in Hawaii, up to an increase of more than 36%, in one state, with a median of 15.5%.

For a look at the five states with the biggest working-age death count increases, based on preliminary weekly data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, see the gallery above.

For data for all 50 states and the District of Columbia, which would have ranked third in the gallery if it were a state, see the chart below.

What It Means

COVID-19, the effects of the pandemic on the economy and the health care system, and other medical, social and economic trends, are continuing to have a devastating effect on mortality for working-age people.

That means advisors and their clients may continue to face high levels of uncertainty about what life expectancy estimates to put into income planning calculators and other planning systems.

The Backdrop

About 1.6 million U.S. residents died from all causes between the week ending Jan. 5 and the week ending June 26, according to the CDC weekly death data.

The figures for the past few weeks are based on incomplete, adjusted death counts that might increase as more states send complete data to the CDC.

The total U.S. death count was down 0.8% from the total for the first half of 2021, but still 15.3% higher than the total for the first half of 2019, before the COVID-19 pandemic began.

For working-age people — people ages 25 through 64 — the number of deaths increased 14.8% between the first half of 2019 and the first half of this year, to about 380,000.

The rate of increase is down from 24% between the first half of 2019 and the first half of 2021, but it appears to be one of the biggest mortality increases for working-age U.S. residents recorded between the end of World War II and the start of the COVID-19 pandemic.

U.S. Deaths From All Causes

Deaths, by Age Group, for the period running from the week ending Jan. 5 through the Week ending June 26. 2022 deaths of people ages 25-64, as a share of deaths of all people ages 25 and older Change in the number of deaths, since 2019, for …
25-44 45-64 25-64 25 and older Adults ages 25-64 Adults ages 25 and older
Alabama 1,485 6,268 7,753 29,506 26.3% 13.0% 15.6%
Alaska 131 590 721 2,358 30.6% 10.2% 20.9%
Arizona 2,056 6,658 8,714 36,984 23.6% 22.5% 24.9%
Arkansas 943 3,755 4,698 18,335 25.6% 17.5% 17.8%
California 8,565 27,218 35,783 151,572 23.6% 15.5% 14.7%
Colorado 1,189 4,224 5,413 23,073 23.5% 9.6% 20.3%
Connecticut 939 2,883 3,822 18,645 20.5% 22.9% 19.9%
Delaware 187 959 1,146 5,599 20.5% 22.6% 31.9%
District of Columbia 221 834 1,055 3,085 34.2% 32.4% 23.3%
Florida 5,689 20,257 25,946 118,926 21.8% 11.4% 16.6%
Georgia 2,199 10,084 12,283 48,456 25.3% 5.2% 18.7%
Hawaii 121 1,036 1,157 6,192 18.7% -2.5% 9.6%
Idaho 349 1,355 1,704 8,079 21.1% 36.2% 17.8%
Illinois 2,978 10,797 13,775 58,114 23.7% 17.8% 14.6%
Indiana 1,767 6,908 8,675 35,605 24.4% 10.9% 12.0%
Iowa 492 2,627 3,119 16,226 19.2% 7.9% 11.3%
Kansas 784 2,640 3,424 15,018 22.8% 24.8% 16.9%
Kentucky 1,452 5,910 7,362 27,318 26.9% 12.5% 16.0%
Louisiana 1,531 5,252 6,783 24,669 27.5% 9.5% 12.8%
Maine 420 1,417 1,837 8,166 22.5% 33.6% 14.9%
Maryland 1,541 5,153 6,694 27,021 24.8% 7.4% 11.4%
Massachusetts 1,436 4,999 6,435 30,965 20.8% 7.8% 7.2%
Michigan 2,584 9,865 12,449 53,588 23.2% 15.1% 15.6%
Minnesota 1,021 3,866 4,887 24,038 20.3% 13.1% 12.2%
Mississippi 982 4,030 5,012 17,824 28.1% 14.3% 15.9%
Missouri 1,519 6,995 8,514 35,464 24.0% 11.3% 15.1%
Montana 256 956 1,212 5,574 21.7% 25.2% 12.9%
Nebraska 355 1,448 1,803 8,922 20.2% 6.3% 8.7%
Nevada 898 3,087 3,985 15,735 25.3% 16.4% 22.4%
New Hampshire 233 1,192 1,425 6,789 21.0% 19.5% 16.8%
New Jersey 1,687 6,830 8,517 39,986 21.3% 11.1% 11.6%
New Mexico 942 2,097 3,039 10,875 27.9% 21.4% 19.9%
New York 2,274 8,838 11,112 54,485 20.4% 18.7% 12.1%
New York City 1,748 5,917 7,665 29,491 26.0% 15.8% 13.2%
North Carolina 3,001 10,999 14,000 54,722 25.6% 19.2% 17.5%
North Dakota 154 666 820 3,610 22.7% 26.2% 7.2%
Ohio 3,404 12,870 16,274 67,567 24.1% 13.7% 14.2%
Oklahoma 1,105 4,756 5,861 22,857 25.6% 14.5% 19.6%
Oregon 1,010 3,544 4,554 21,002 21.7% 17.0% 16.4%
Pennsylvania 3,199 12,265 15,464 72,006 21.5% 11.0% 10.4%
Puerto Rico 764 2,466 3,230 16,556 19.5% 1.5% 15.8%
Rhode Island 124 844 968 5,290 18.3% 13.9% 6.4%
South Carolina 1,524 5,599 7,123 28,524 25.0% 13.2% 19.5%
South Dakota 106 750 856 4,197 20.4% 23.0% 10.2%
Tennessee 2,720 9,351 12,071 42,836 28.2% 17.5% 18.3%
Texas 7,269 24,479 31,748 118,468 26.8% 19.9% 21.7%
Utah 695 1,799 2,494 10,933 22.8% 11.0% 18.9%
Vermont 11 569 580 3,233 17.9%  * *
Virginia 2,107 7,443 9,550 39,895 23.9% 19.5% 19.8%
Washington 1,693 5,702 7,395 32,705 22.6% 15.8% 15.5%
West Virginia 747 2,796 3,543 13,396 26.4% 19.4% 20.0%
Wisconsin 1,377 4,979 6,356 29,058 21.9% 21.5% 13.7%
Wyoming 12 440 452 2,492 18.1% 11.3% 21.9%
TOTAL 81,996 299,262 381,258 1,606,030 23.7%
MEDIAN 23.5% 15.5% 15.8%
Source: Weekly Counts of Deaths by Jurisdiction and Age. Complete Vermont data for 2019 is not currently available. New York City reports its data separately from the data for New York state.

(Image: Imillian/Adobe Stock)