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Webinar: Top Tax Changes to Watch for the 2021 Filing Season

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Robert Bloink and William H. Byrnes Robert Bloink and William H. Byrnes

Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, tax and financial planners have been left with a whole lot to consider this year.

Between Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) second-draw loans, new safe harbors, the employee retention tax credit, Flexible Spending Account (FSA) rollovers, the return of required minimum distributions  and the end of COVID-19 hardship loans, it can be difficult for most people to keep up with it all.

To help advisors prepare for the 2021 tax season and better grasp how certain policies may affect clients and their retirement plans by the rapidly approaching tax filing date (April 15), tax experts Robert Bloink and William H. Byrnes will speak from 2 to 3 p.m. Eastern time, Wednesday, Feb. 17, about the biggest tax implications of recent tax changes.

The webinar can be classified as a sequel to their Nov. 18 webinar “What Will Be the Biggest Tax Implications for 2021?” which was designed to help advisors prepare for 2021 and better grasp how certain policies may affect clients and their retirement plans whether the Democrats or Republicans ended up controlling the Senate.

Bloink has taught at the Texas A&M University School of Law and the Thomas Jefferson School of Law; in the past decade, he has initiated more than $2 billion in insurance and alternative asset class portfolios, and previously served as a senior attorney in the IRS Office of Chief Counsel for the Large- and Mid-Sized Business Division.

Byrnes is an executive professor and associate dean of special projects at the Texas A&M University School of Law. A pioneer of online legal education, he also is the author or co-author of 20 tax books and legal treatises.

Register now for the free webinar “Preparing for Tax Season after the 2020 Tax Law Changes” at 2–3 p.m. Eastern on Wednesday, Feb. 17.

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