A USA map showing that Tennessee seems to have a lot of binge drinking, and so do West Virginia, Arizona and South Dakota. Alaska, Montana, the West Coast, and the East Coast look pretty sober (Credit: Allison Bell/ALM)

In theory, binge drinking should be one of the easiest health risk factors to control.

But binge drinking, and other forms of heavy drinking, are continuing to become more common in many states, even among typical financial services prospects: people from households with annual income over more than $50,000.

Binge drinking can ruin the lives, and careers, of your clients and prospects, and it drives up overall U.S. spending, by leading to liver problems and other health problems.

Managers of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey program collect data on binge drinking by asking the male participants how often they drink five or more drinks at a time, and female participants how often they drink four or more drinks at a time.

More articles in this Health Data Atlas collection:

The map shows how, according to the BRFSS data, state binge-drinking rates changed, for adults with household income of $50,000 or higher, between 2013 and 2018.

For trend data for all 50 states and the District of Columbia, see the table below.

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Binge Drinking

The percentage of adults, with annual household income over $50,000, who say they have had a lot to drink during one round of drinking, at least once, in the past 30 days.
The CDC survey team defines “binge drinking” as males having five or more drinks on one occasion, and females having four or more drinks on one occasion.
Location 2013 2018 Change (in percentage points)
Alabama 13.7 16.0 2.3
Alaska 21.2 18.3 -2.9
Arizona 14.3 18.4 4.1
Arkansas 12.5 16.5 4.0
California 19.1 18.6 -0.5
Colorado 19.5 22.0 2.5
Connecticut 21 20.5 -0.5
Delaware 19.8 21.9 2.1
District of Columbia 28.6 29.3 0.7
Florida 17.8 18.6 0.8
Georgia 16.2 17.1 0.9
Guam 24.2 20.1 -4.1
Hawaii 20.2 21.7 1.5
Idaho 15 17.0 2.0
Illinois 24.5 23.1 -1.4
Indiana 17.8 19.9 2.1
Iowa 27.2 27.9 0.7
Kansas 17.2 18.6 1.4
Kentucky 18.2 18.1 -0.1
Louisiana 18.2 21.5 3.3
Maine 18.4 20.5 2.1
Maryland 16.4 17.6 1.2
Massachusetts 21.4 23.8 2.4
Michigan 22.8 22.6 -0.2
Minnesota 24.2 24.1 -0.1
Mississippi 16.1 16.4 0.3
Missouri 21.1 22.2 1.1
Montana 22.3 20.8 -1.5
Nebraska 22.9 24.4 1.5
Nevada 18.6 18.3 -0.3
New Hampshire 19.6 20.4 0.8
New Jersey 19.6 17.0 -2.6
New Mexico 16.9 17.6 0.7
New York 22.3 21.0 -1.3
North Carolina 15.3 17.4 2.1
North Dakota 28.2 26.2 -2.0
Ohio 20.7 19.4 -1.3
Oklahoma 14.5 16.2 1.7
Oregon 17.1 18.4 1.3
Pennsylvania 21.1 20.4 -0.7
Puerto Rico 24.1 21.0 -3.1
Rhode Island 22.3 20.9 -1.4
South Carolina 17.8 18.9 1.1
South Dakota 20.8 24.7 3.9
Tennessee 11.9 18.0 6.1
Texas 19.6 20.7 1.1
Utah 12.9 12.3 -0.6
Vermont 18.3 19.9 1.6
Virginia 18.3 18.5 0.2
Washington 18.2 16.9 -1.3
West Virginia 12.2 17.2 5.0
Wisconsin 26 29.2 3.2
Wyoming 17 20.3 3.3
MEDIAN 19.1 19.93 0.92

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— Read 10 States Where Stroke May Hurt Your Saleson ThinkAdvisor.

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