If you’re already good, how much better can you get? Is it worth it to even try?

As a life-long learner, I always look for ways to take my skills to the next level. I think it matters. That’s why I attended a special masterclass last week that was put on by Michael Port, author of the just-released book, Steal the Show.  

At this session, four very brave individuals paid extra money for a live one-hour coaching session with Michael in front of hundreds of people. At the start of their turn, each speaker gave us (the audience) a quick overview of his/her target market.

We then applauded as they walked onto the stage and began their speech. I was impressed. Clearly they’d prepped for this event.

About five minutes into each presentation, Michael jumped up on the stage to offer some suggestions.

He’d say, “It’s good. And, we’re going to make it better.”

Then he’d offer an idea or two, sharing why he thought it would help. Often, he’d demonstrate what he wanted them to try instead. Many times the speaker would be staring at him in disbelief, obviously thinking, “You want me to do/say that?”

Michael would respond, “Maybe it’ll work; maybe it won’t. Let’s play with it.” 

And that’s exactly what they did. They played with words, timing, stories, transitions, posture, and movement. They added details and subtracted irrelevancies.

After each bit of coaching, the speaker tried the new way. It was often awkward at first and didn’t quite work.

But they kept playing with it, as the speaker practiced and practiced in front of us all. Once they’d nailed it, they moved on to the next item to be improved.

By the end of the hour, the difference was profound.

Each speaker had improved exponentially. They were more impactful and more engaging. We (the audience) liked them better and learned much more from them.

As I was watching, my mind was spinning. I thought of dozens of ways to improve my keynotes — and I’m already damn good. I can’t wait to start playing with and practicing these new approaches because I know the difference it can make.

But what about you? What can you start playing with?  

Perhaps you could take your sales meetings to the next level. Maybe you could make them more engaging and relevant. Or how about your presentations or demonstrations? Could they be more impactful?

When you have your new “creation,” don’t just rely on your own perspective about its beauty. Get other people involved. Test yourself in real time. Find new ways to make it better. 

Personally, I’m following my own advice right now. I have a new keynote I’m fine-tuning that’s focused on the topic of the new book I just started. I just gave my third presentation on it two weeks ago.

It has morphed so significantly since my attempt that you might not even recognize it as the same program. That’s a good thing. I’m better because of it.

And I’m still learning. That’s also a good thing! Join me.

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