The New York Times ran a pretty good package of Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) progress articles this week (conclusions: PPACA has helped some, hurt some, and not been in effect long enough for us to really know how it will work).

But I think the Times article that may have more of an impact is Joyce Wadler’s column about helping her mother deal with a stroke while she herself was dealing with a crippled wrist.

The column was funny and moving.

Wadler is an early boomer. She was born in 1948 and used to write about people like Abbie Hoffman and features for Rolling Stone Magazine.

There seems to be a sense in the long-term care (LTC) planning community that the core market is people who grew up swooning over Frank Sinatra. But people who wore bobby socks when bobby socks were hot are aging quickly into the “old, old” category.

The consumers who still have a reasonable chance of getting through the health underwriting and know firsthand how caregiving works are members of the Rolling Stone generation, or perhaps younger. Maybe former SPY Magazine readers or early e-mail users.

The ideal aspirational LTC planning spokesperson may soon be someone with tats, dreads and pierced eyebrows.