I hate the phone and so should you

Why on earth would a person choose to become an advisor if they had no control over their day-to-day activities?

Let’s be honest, the list of challenges, uncertainties, and downright frustrations of being an advisor is painfully long, especially in the early years.

The idea that you’re a financial advisor because of the money, the unlimited income potential, is an alluring story that too often ends in broken dreams and possibly crushing debt. Until you’re a seasoned advisor with a robust and faithful client base, being an advisor ain’t no picnic.

Why then, would any of us choose to do the things that appear to be “required” of us if we hate doing them? Case in point: I very much dislike making prospecting and appointment setting calls. I know all of the objections and how to overcome them in order to secure the appointment (“Would you prefer Tuesday morning or Thursday afternoon?”).

I supported a young family for years as a result of my willingness to get on the phone a sufficient number of times each day to hit my numbers. I can and will do the phone deal in order to reach my goals. But now I don’t.

If you are struggling with an area of the business that you really dislike, make it a continued priority to change that aspect or eliminate it altogether. Find a new way to engineer your process so that you can focus only on the activities that you enjoy and are really good at. That may require you to invest in a team that handles outgoing phone calls, or managing your firm’s financials, or even closing prospects if that’s not your thing.

It starts with being incredibly honest with yourself. Do you really dislike that area or do you need to master it to gain more confidence? Those are two very different things, by the way.

In a world that desperately needs competent financial advice offered by honest, professional, and respectful advisors, we have a special job to do. Part of that job requires that you get serious about seeking great mentors and shutting out the rest of the noise. There are many who will tell you that you simply have to do certain activities that clearly aren’t your strengths.

Rather than think in terms of “I” consider how “we” can do those activities at a very high level. In other words, rethink your business by focusing on and leveraging your strengths while allowing others on your team to glorify your weaknesses.  

Life is short and this career can be very short if you feel that you must do it all, yourself.