29. Referred, not cold.

I have worked in the insurance industry for 20 years and my best clients are my clients that are referred. I then work with their children and grandchildren. I work the American legacy into my practice and the clients are prepared and have the peace of mind they have always dreamed of.

—Tamara Bartlett Grafton

28. Chip off the old block.

I have found that the best prospects are the  children of my clients. When they see what I have been able to do for their  parents, they say “Can you help me, too?” Of course, my answer is “yes.” My  clients’ children have 401(k) plans that have lost money in the stock market  and, with all of those fees, it is easy to  do an in-service withdrawal for them.

—Jim Cadle

27. It’s not about you. 

The second you get into a long monologue about what you do, you run the risk of putting people to sleep. No one cares what you do. If they care about anything, it’s how what you’re offering might affect them and/or the people they might introduce you to. Go on and on about the ins and outs of your business and you are going to turn people off.

—Adrian Miller

big26. Big pharma.

A simple way to secure new referrals is to get to know your local pharmacist on a personal level. Share with him/her what you do regarding long-term care insurance, or Medicare, etc. Many seniors share personal information and issues with this trusted person. I have had numerous referrals from this source. You have nothing to lose.

—Rick Lehrer

25. Strong relationships keep your business growing.

Having at least seven touches a year has helped keep me in front of the folks I’ve done business with. Most of them have told their friends and family about what I do so it continues to grow my business.

—Dean Hempel

24. Follow up. 

It’s the only thing that will provide you with ROI for your networking efforts. Simply put, if you don’t take the time to develop robust relationships, you can kiss your introductions and referrals goodbye. Nothing happens until you have multiple conversations and/or meetings with your potential referral sources. You need to develop trust, and trust takes time.

—Adrian Miller

23. The key is consistency and follow-up.

Most of the appointments that I set that aren’t referrals are with prospects that told me to do something and follow up and I did!

—Ron L. Stahl

s22. Speak up. 

Offer to speak to various groups of people—at the work site, at libraries, churches and senior community centers. Once you engage one or two people, you get referrals to their co-workers, friends, and family members.

—Anonymous

21. Unearth the orphans.

I work with referrals and orphan policy holders from various insurance companies.

—Arthur Cambridge

20. Electronic database. 

It’s important to get email addresses from all your clients, with their permission to accept your information from time-to-time. Send them tips and solutions up to twice per month. The info can be a product or service you wish to offer, or totally unrelated. This serves both to keep your name in front of them and also to maintain a “trusted advisor” status.

—Kal Reece, Freedom Equity

19. Networking is a game of patience and strategy.

You need to play it well in order to get results. Think long and hard about which networking events you should attend and what you hope to get out of each event. Be strategic. Not every group or meeting is right for everyone. But the good news is there is a group for everyone. It can take months and even years before you see profitable results from your networking efforts. But if you can forge the right bonds, the effort you put in to networking can come back to you many times over.

—Adrian Miller

For more sales & marketing tips, visit LifeHealthPro’s 100 Best Sales & Marketing Ideas.