40. School work.

We work with schools and park districts in our community to engage awareness of aging and proactive and participatory planning. It takes a village concept! Decision makers are more plugged into these organizations in their communities on a daily basis and third-party edification can be acquired with an outreach approach.

—Kathleen Ramsey

39. Educate.

Always tell the senior you’re there to provide service for them and to teach them about the product, not just sell them.

—Joseph P. Howard

38. Do what works.

My best idea is what I know works…I educate. Seminars that build credibility and inform are the backbone of my marketing.

—Tasha Settles

37. Stats, man.

Use statistical games to educate seniors regarding their future needs, whether financial, medical or estate.

—Robert Keane

36. Big picture.

I take a holistic approach with clients. I review their protection needs in all meetings. I believe in educating clients on all financial topics. I usually invite a client to lunch and ask them to invite a friend or family member who is free to ask any questions or concerns they have about a financial topic.

—Joseph Zaccardo

Town Hall35. Town Hall meets.

I speak at town hall meetings at senior living centers. Providing educational information in a non-threatening way has proven to be very fruitful.

—Robert Altizer

34. Earned income.

Many boomers that have retired may still be looking for opportunities to earn income and stay abreast of current changes in the financial world. Providing them with an opportunity to attend seminars and possibly even have a part-time career can be rewarding.

—Mark Lawerenz

33. Non-sales approach.

I am primarily a retirement planning advisor and I use two sources to attract boomer clients. I conduct retirement seminars for the employees in the plans I administer and I hold “non-sales” meetings at local sites for individuals of local organizations.

—Tom McConville

32. A Medicare plan that works.

I market to boomers within my group-plan clients as they age out to Medicare eligibility age.

—Mark V. Belli

31. Do your homework.

Acquire knowledge about what it takes to build trust with boomers (empathy, vulnerability, build a relationship before you present your company and product) and make greater use of storytelling techniques to get your desired information across. Reinforce the strong boomer sense of self-reliance and be very, very careful about using the word “senior”!

—Louis Franco

30. What is your marketing, and what is your message?

Get the word out. There’s that old expression, “Your outflow determines your inflow.” The more information you can get out to the public, the greater the opportunity. People are hungry for answers, and they’re fed up with Wall Street. If you can show people things they’ve never heard before, and you explain it in a way they can understand, people will flock to your practice. Educate, treat people with respect, and make the complex simple.

—Jim Brogan

For more sales & marketing tips, visit LifeHealthPro’s 100 Best Sales & Marketing Ideas.