If you don’t follow the recipe, your cake won’t turn out as it should. This is also true in business, where your recipe is your business model. Most of us don’t sell at the lowest price nor do we sell the best product. We sell the best total solution — high-touch, meaningful insights, deep caring and accountability for results — and that requires customer intimacy. That’s what makes you worth paying more for.

If you try to operate this strategy without the intimacy, you won’t know enough to deliver the promised value. Without the intimacy, you don’t have the relationship, which is an essential ingredient.

Your interactions with your clients should be special; they’re not simply transactions. You should not simply go through the motions. High touch means that you are proactive. Your interactions have to leave your client with something even more than a positive feeling. The recipe calls for deep caring. Your clients have to feel it. If the interactions aren’t special, it isn’t the right recipe.

Without meaningful insights and ideas, you won’t know how to create the best overall solution. You might have the intimacy, but if it isn’t backed up by some serious business acumen and situational knowledge, you can’t deliver the results the recipe demands.

Most of us have moved passed selling product. We sell outcomes. We sell the fact that we are accountable for those outcomes. Even if you have the intimacy, the high-touch approach to interactions, the meaningful insights and the caring, if you aren’t accountable for the results, you’re deviating from the recipe.

Imagine you are making your favorite dish. Now leave out one of the primary ingredients. Your chocolate cake may look like a chocolate cake to the outside world, but anyone who tastes it will immediately know that something went wrong. Follow the recipe and you’ll achieve result you’re after.

Sign up for The Lead and get a new tip in your inbox every day! More tips:

S. Anthony Iannarino is the managing director of B2B Sales Coach & Consultancy, a boutique sales coaching and consulting company, and an adjunct faculty member at Capital University’s School of Management and Leadership. For more information, go http://thesalesblog.com/s-anthony-iannarino/