Holding an American flag and a copy of the Constitution, Dan, who asked not to use his last name, of Virginia, protests against the health care law, Monday, March 26, 2012, outside of the Supreme Court in Washington after the first day of arguments on President Obama's health care legislation. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

While covering the circus outside the Supreme Court’s PPACA hearings yesterday, I noticed a group of about seven people standing quietly at the bottom of the court steps. They all had tape over their mouths, and a couple were reading the Bible.

I stopped to talk to them, and it turned out they were pro-life protestors. Their organization has been setting up camp at the Supreme Court daily, for the last 7 years, to demonstrate against abortions. The protestors are made up of volunteers who fly in every so often, from places as far away as South Dakota, to put in a few days for their cause.

I won’t go into my reasons, because that’s not exactly the point of today’s blog, but I am ardently pro-choice. I oppose just about everything this anti-abortion group stands for. But we spoke politely about it for a few minutes, and I walked away feeling something I didn’t expect to for those protestors: admiration.

In fact, I’ve felt that way throughout the PPACA hearings and demonstrations here in Washington, D.C., this week. People on all sides of the debate have stepped up to voice their opinions and defend their beliefs, and though I don’t agree with all of them, it’s hard to find fault in their actions. They’re busy exercising a basic right that many of us have mothballed.

I can’t tell you where most of my friends stand on PPACA. I’ve never asked. Even though it’s an issue that will affect every single person in the United States, we never talk about it, because it’s not considered polite or politically correct. (Also, it’s not as much fun as talking about, for instance, Snooki being pregnant.) And I doubt we’re in the minority.

Watching hundreds of people openly express their feelings about a divisive, hush-hush issue made me think of a conversation I had with Joe Jordan, the insurance guru and a senior vice president at MetLife, last week. He told me about his frustration with insurance agents who masquerade as something else — financial planners, protection coaches — because they’re embarrassed by what they do. (My full interview with Joe will appear in the May issue of Life Insurance Selling and here on LifeHealthPro.) While these protestors are openly expressing their views, loudly and proudly, many insurance agents are doing the exact opposite. And isn’t that kind of sad?

So whatever your thoughts on PPACA, or abortion or insurance agent stereotypes, take a lesson from the protestors on both sides of the debate this week. Change the title on your business card to LIFE INSURANCE AGENT, all caps. Emblazon your job on a T-shirt and wear it everywhere you go, “Scarlet Letter”-style. Or just make a point of talking to more people about life insurance. It’s your basic right; exercise it.

Corey Dahl is life channel and social media editor for LifeHealthPro as well as managing editor of Life Insurance Selling. Contact her at cdahl@sbmedia.com.

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