Twenty-one percent of U.K. adults between the ages 45 and 65 no longer believe their financial plans will support them into the future, according to a new survey.

Standard Life, Edinburgh, Scotland, published this finding in a summary of results from a new report. The research, conducted between August and September, is based on a YouGov Plc online survey of 982 U.K. adults between the ages 45 to 65.

The report also discloses that 6% of respondents who aren’t already retired don’t think they will be able to retire, equating to more than three quarters of a million people.

Of those who have financial plans to provide for their long term future, 64% of 45-65 year-olds are confident that their financial plans will support their future post-retirement. Twenty-one per cent of these adults, the survey says, no longer believe their plans will support them into the future, with a further 10% having never felt confident.

The reports adds that 37% of 45-65s have no financial plans in place for their long-term future. Yet 72% of respondents who aren’t retired think they will retire between 61 and 70 years old.

“The current financial crisis has brought into sharp focus the need to make and review appropriate plans,” says John Lawson, head of pensions policy at Standard Life. “This will clearly be challenging but there are many things you can do to make your retirement years as secure as possible.”

In a separate online survey of 2053 adults, conducted in September by YouGov Plc., Standards Life reveals that one-third (32%) of retired Britons declared that losing a partner, loved one or close friend is their greatest fear in retirement.

The research also shows that nearly half (47%) of U.K. adults want to leave an inheritance to their children, with a tenth (11%) directing it to their grandchildren.