We spend significant time, thought and energy building our websites, but once the site is live, we soon forget about it and neglect it. Below are seven tips to help you clean up your website.

1. Update information. Make sure phone numbers, addresses, e-mail addresses, social media sites and fax numbers are correct and staff bios are up-to-date. Also, review versions of documents you may have on your site, such as your form ADV or business continuity plan. Finally, check that your disclosures are up to date and accurate in your website footer.

2. Review text, photos and graphics. Reread your entire website to ensure the message on your site is the same one you want to communicate to clients and prospects. Maybe you have added new services you would like to highlight. Also, review all images and graphics on your site. Remove any old or dated images that contradict your overall brand image or message.

3. Update news and resources. When was the last time you added a press release, updated your events page, added a newsletter to the archive or posted a video to your website? If the last newsworthy item you posted was prior to the fourth quarter of 2010, it’s time to add new information.

4. Check links. If you provide links to third-party sites, make sure they all work. Nothing is more frustrating for a visitor than clicking on a broken link to nowhere. Make a visit to your site enjoyable by ensuring that links on all your pages are active.

5. Remove “under construction” pages. Having an “under construction” page on your website is worse than having no page at all. Delete these pages immediately. You can always add them back once you have sufficient content to fill the page.

6. Update your copyright notice. If you include a copyright notice in the footer of your site, make sure it now states “Copyright (R)2011.” It’s not too embarrassing if it still shows 2010, but if it lists a year earlier than that, it gives the impression that your site is rarely, if ever, updated.

7. Get rid of the clutter. Remove content from your website that doesn’t communicate who you are, who you help, and how you help or doesn’t provide a valuable resource directly relevant to your target market. If you have generic calculators, market snapshots, articles and Web links on your site, you fall into this category.

Kristen Luke is the principal of Wealth Management Marketing Inc., a firm dedicated to providing marketing strategies and support for Registered Investment Advisory firms. For more information, visit www.wealthmanagementmarketing.net.