Tens of millions of U.S. workers are still one serious illness or injury away from financial disaster.

Insurance groups and companies are driving that point home in reports released to draw attention to the Disability Insurance Awareness Month campaign, which started May 1.

The Life and Health Insurance Foundation for Education, Arlington, Va., reports that only 48% of the workers who participated in a recent survey it commissioned said that it is imperative to have disability income insurance.

One-quarter of the survey participants admitted that they do not know whether they have employer-sponsored disability insurance, and 41% of the participants who said they do have employer-sponsored disability insurance do not know how much the coverage would pay if they became disabled.

About 22% of the participants seem to believe that the employer-sponsored coverage would replace a higher percentage of their income than it really would, LIFE reports.

LIMRA, Windsor, Conn., says in a summary of results from another survey that only 26% of the Americans it polled – and only 13% of the small business owners – have disability insurance.

Sales of disability insurance to women are growing faster than sales of disability insurance to men, and sales of coverage to consumers ages 50 and older are growing than sales to consumers in younger age groups.

Only 18% of the participants in the LIMRA survey could remember being approached about buying disability insurance, and only 1% said they had shopped for disability coverage on their own initiative.

CIGNA Corp., Philadelphia (NYSE:CI), has published a summary of a third survey indicating that 33% of U.S. workers say work gives them satisfaction, and 18% say they would keep their current jobs even if they won the lottery.

Some the survey participants said they are trying to protect themselves against the risk of disability. Only 12% identified participating in workplace wellness programs as a strategy for avoiding disability.