Baby boomers comprise nearly 30 percent of all Internet users. Here are some fast facts on how to grab the attention of the 56.7 million online boomers from online market research firm eMarketer:

Establish trust. Make sure your products and services live up to their claims. Boomers are more willing to try competing brands and services than younger consumers. They’re also more likely to spread the word about those experiences, good and bad.

Be inviting. Make sure your site is easy for baby boomers to access and use. eMarketer suggests the following: Offer visitors the ability to enlarge the size of fonts and photos; keep the design simple, not cluttered; display your privacy policy prominently; and make sure content is written in concise, understandable language.

Provide relevant information. Boomers pay attention to advertising about products and services they’ve decided to purchase. And they’re very willing to go online to find out more about those products and services, whether they heard about them from a friend or were motivated by ads in other media.

Don’t waste their time. Boomers view the Internet as a tool to help them accomplish tasks and lead better lives. They don’t spend as much time online as younger generations in part because of their utilitarian attitude. Prepare your landing pages to reflect the search terms Internet users type in so they don’t hit the back button to return to the search engine results page.

Helpful statistics:

  • 74 percent use the Internet at least once a month;
  • Younger boomers outnumber older boomers online 35.3 million to 21.4 million;
  • More boomer women are Internet users than boomer men;
  • 21 percent of boomers report not having Internet access;
  • 62 percent of households headed by someone age 50 or older had annual incomes of $75,000 or more, nearly 5 percent higher than in 2004;
  • 61 percent said it doesn’t pay to be loyal to one brand, especially in today’s marketplace;
  • 68 percent of baby boomer women trust recommendations and rated information they heard in conversations as credible; and
  • Further underscoring these findings, in a recent survey from the public relations firm Edelman, 54 percent of baby boomers said the advertising industry misrepresents and neglects them, especially online, where 72.5 percent of younger boomers and 83.2 percent of older boomers said online advertising focused on younger age groups.