Many employees say they want benefits information geared toward people in their specific stage of life.

Researchers at MetLife Inc., New York, have reported that finding in a summary of results from a July survey of 1,203 full-time employees, ages 21 and older, who work at companies with 500 or more total employees.

The researchers commissioned the survey to find out what workers think about benefits open-enrollment periods.

About 59% of the participants told researchers they would like their employers to suggest benefits that would be appropriate for a person in their particular life stage, and 22% said getting advice designed for “people like me” would improve their open enrollment experience.

Roughly 84% of the workers who want advice tailored for their life-stage said they would be willing to share information about income, number of children and marital status with company benefits managers in order to get the tailored advice.

In other survey results, about 58% of participants who said they feel negative or not confident about benefits decisions reported that they blame their employers for the bad feelings.

When employees feel happy during the open enrollment process, 82% give themselves credit for their good cheer and only 38% share credit with their employers, the researchers report.