To The Editor:

As the parent of a homosexual child, I feel compelled to challenge the ideas expressed in the July 23, 2001 “Letters” column.

Allow me to describe the so-called “illegitimate lifestyle” of my daughter.

She graduated from college 8 years ago and immediately secured full-time employment. In addition to working full time, she is attending graduate school on weekends and evenings and devoting many hours per week teaching disadvantaged teenagers creative writing and performance art as part of the community outreach program at her neighborhood church.

She has been in a loving, monogamous relationship for the past 6 years with the partner of her choice. She works, pays taxes, cooks, cleans, reads, parties, does laundry, rides the subway, shops and talks on the phone to friends. She has cranky days and good days. In other words, the life she leads is no different than that of any other young adult in the world. Her father and I (like most other parents) love her and worry about her.

As an insurance professional, I am thrilled that other insurance people have finally “discovered” this group of people, potential clients, that need services. Assisting people who were born homosexual with their financial planning is not going to increase D. Dahl’s taxes or “create turmoil” any more than assisting those born left-handed or with green eyes would.

Homosexuals are no different than anyone else except for the fact that they are the last minority with unprotected civil rights–something I hope to see changed in my lifetime. Both gentlemen need to wake up and look at the people around them.

Bonnie Garneau

Elmhurst, Ill.


Reproduced from National Underwriter Life & Health/Financial Services Edition, September 10, 2001. Copyright 2001 by The National Underwriter Company in the serial publication. All rights reserved.Copyright in this article as an independent work may be held by the author.


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