Cappex.com, a website focusing on college admissions and financial aid, has just launched a free college application platform that is accepted by more than 125 institutions, mostly private.

Students pay no fee no matter how many schools they apply to, which can save families hundreds of dollars since most colleges charge between $50 and $75 per application and many students apply to multiple schools. (The College Board reports that students apply to five to eight schools in order to be accepted into a suitable school, but many high school seniors apply to more than that).

Cappex Application also includes about 20% fewer questions than other multi-college application platforms because it has eliminated redundant questions, according to the company. 

(Related: How American Families Pay for College: 2017)

Since its soft launch last year, Cappex Application, which officially launched Aug. 1, has grown to be the second largest college application platform after the Common Application, which has 700 participating colleges, but it is the only one that is completely free. The other multi-college applications, the Coalition Application, Universal College Application and Common Application, include some free applications but not all of them are free.

High school seniors already on the Cappex.com site to research and compare colleges, including admission criteria and financial aid information, plan college visits and search for scholarships can easily prefill the Cappex Application with information from their Cappex user profiles, streamlining the application process.  The application also uses the same core essays for every college.

The Cappex Application “lets students complete the entire college match and college application process on a single platform,” said Alex Stepien, Cappex CEO, in a statement. “We think this will be a game changer in simplifying the college decision process for students and families.”

Cappex.com has more than 9 million registered student users who use the site to plan and pay for college.

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