Most experienced investors in a recent survey said they were satisfied with their investment management in a year marked by significant volatility and major market events, E-Trade Financial reported Friday.

Investors in E-Trade’s quarterly study self-select as having moderate to professional investing experience. They have taken charge of their investments and believe they understand markets, investment products and asset classes.

ResearchNow conducted the survey in early October among an online U.S. sample of 954 self-directed active investors, 65% male and 35% female, who manage at least $10,000 in an online brokerage account. The panel was broken into thirds of active investors who trade more than once a week, swing investors who trade less than once a week but more than once a month and passive ones who trade less than once a month.

Investors in the poll also identified four top resolutions for the coming year:

  1. 42% resolved to use online tools more regularly to ensure they are properly diversified and meeting their goals
  2. 39% expressed a desire to adjust their mix of assets to reflect changing market conditions
  3. 35% wanted to learn more about investing, trading and markets
  4. 34% said they would allocate more to their retirement plan

“It was a turbulent ride to say the least in 2016, and the data suggests investors took short-term market fluctuations in stride,” Lena Haas, senior vice president of investing at E-Trade Financial, said in a statement.

“Further, while these investors are satisfied with the investing path they are on, they are ready to kick their management up a notch in 2017.”

The survey showed that 43% of millennials were eager to learn more about investing, trading and the markets, compared with less than one-third of their Gen X and boomer counterparts who said they wanted to increase their knowledge.

In addition, 48% of millennials said they wanted to increase the amount they contribute to their retirement plan, as did 42% of Gen Xers, but only 12% of boomers.

Fifty-two percent of boomers said they would change their asset allocation in 2017 to better reflect market conditions.

Haas said investors who are nearing or already in retirement may feel their portfolios need to be adjusted to preserve income through tax-loss harvesting, align with their retirement goals or reflect changes in their risk tolerance.

Forty percent of Gen Xers said they, too, would tweak their asset allocation next year, as did 24% of millennials.