PPACA issues accounted for about 1.7 percent of Taxpayer Advocate Service cases. (LHP/Allison Bell)

A new report from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) shows how spending at two major Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) public exchange subsidy programs grew between federal fiscal year 2014 and federal fiscal year 2015.

The federal fiscal year starts Oct. 1 and runs through Sept. 30.

Exchange plan users received a total of $30 billion in PPACA advance premium tax credit (APTC) subsidies and cost-sharing reduction subsidies during the 12-month period that ended Sept. 30, 2015, according to the IRS Data Book for fiscal year 2015.

The exchange plan system and the exchange plan subsidy came to life Jan. 1, 2014.

The first exchange plan users received $13 billion in APTC and cost-sharing reduction subsidies from Jan. 1, 2014, through Sept. 30, 2014, according to the fiscal year 2014 data book.

Average monthly subsidy spending increased to $2.5 billion in fiscal year 2015, from about $1.5 billion during the nine months that the exchange system was in operation in 2014.

Total fiscal year 2015 PPACA exchange subsidy spending amounted to 8.7 percent of the individual income tax refund total. In fiscal year 2014, spending on PPACA exchange subsidies amounted to just 3.6 percent of the fiscal year 2014 individual income tax refund total.

In fiscal year 2015, taxpayers received about $21 billion in child tax credit subsidies and about $60 billion in earned income tax credit subsidies.

Exchange plan subsidy users first began including subsidy information on their tax returns in early calendar-year 2015, when they were filing their 2014 returns.

The new fiscal year 2015 data book includes a little information about PPACA’s effects on the IRS Taxpayer Advocate Service.

The service handled 3,758 PPACA-related cases in fiscal year 2015. The PPACA-related cases accounted for 1.7 percent of all of the advocate service cases, according to the IRS data. 

See also:

Watchdog finds $447 million IRS PPACA tax credit math error

PPACA penalties will cost more than health coverage for millions

 

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