Gallup was not able to adjust for consumers' share of the premium costs.

U.S. adults with government-run health coverage seem to be happier with how the U.S. health system is working for them than other consumers are, according to a new batch of survey data from Gallup.

But, because of the way Gallup collected and presented the data, it’s not clear what exactly the consumer satisfaction numbers really mean.

Rebecca Rifkin, analyst at Gallup, used survey data collected from Jan. 1 through Oct. 31 to compare participant health system satisfaction levels.

Despite allegations of serious problems with treatment delays at veterans facilities, participants with military or veterans coverage ranked first in terms of satisfaction with how the health care system is working for them, with 78 percent of the holders of military and veterans coverage saying they were satisfied.

For participants with other types of coverage as their primary insurance type, health system satisfaction levels were 77 percent for Medicare users, 75 percent for Medicaid users, 69 percent for employer-sponsored health coverage users, 65 percent for individual health users and 41 percent for the uninsured.

Rifkin was not able to adjust the data for factors such as the participants’ health status, the participants’ share of premiums, out-of-pocket costs or problems with getting access to care.

Similarly, she could not distinguish between survey participants who had active military coverage and those who had veterans coverage, or between participants who had traditional Medicare and those who had Medicare Advantage plans.

Satisfaction levels may depend partly on the consumers’ share of the premiums and partly on the consumers’ out-of-pocket cost levels, Rifkin says.