The U.S. Chamber says extending FLSA rules to direct-care workers could make care to expensive for some.

(Bloomberg) — Home-care workers won the right to overtime pay and the minimum wage after a U.S. court Friday upheld a Labor Department rule that was challenged by business groups.

The Obama administration said the decision by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia covers almost 2 million workers “whose demanding work merits these fundamental wage guarantees.”

The rule helps ensure a “stable and professional workforce” for recipients of the services, according to a statement Friday from the Labor Department.

“We are thrilled that this historic ruling will remedy an injustice millions of dedicated, hardworking caregivers have had to tolerate for far too long,” said Christine Owens, executive director of the National Employment Law Project.

A lower court had ruled that the Labor Department exceeded its authority in extending the wage protections. The rule was opposed by the Washington-based U.S. Chamber of Commerce, which has said it would make home-health care too expensive for some.

See also: Home care agencies get six-month reprieve

Congress extended benefits to domestic workers when it amended the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) in 1974. The measure included a narrow exemption for babysitters and workers who provide “companionship” services that the Labor Department later interpreted to include direct-care workers.

See also: Hillary Clinton courts home care workers

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