One in three U.S. investors knows someone who has been a victim of scams or frauds.

Roughly one in three American investors are worried about older family members or friends being exploited through financial fraud or abuse.

These numbers came to light in the Wells Fargo/Gallup Investor and Retirement Optimism Index, conducted May 22-31.

While that number may seem substantial it, falls well below how much people  worry over personal identity theft (57%), cyberattacks on their savings or investments (47%), stock market volatility (42%) and investment scams or frauds (41%).

What’s more troublesome is that one in three U.S. investors knows someone who has been a victim of scams or frauds.

As one might suspect, those investors who know a victim or more likely (51%) to worry than those who do not know a victim (23%).

Other highlights from the study:

  • Thirty-four percent of investors younger than age 65 are worried, compared with 28 percent of those 65 and older.
  • Almost half of investors (47%) say they are likely to rely on a personal financial advisor to protect themselves or their family members from elder financial abuse in the future.