That well-known company mascot, at Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade. (AP Photo)

Taking the broad leap of logic that you are actually spending the holiday with your family and not prospecting for new clients or working on closing some new business, let us lighten the mood a little for Thanksgiving.

(Though—thinking about it—the often wonderfully random selection of friends-of-friends guests at an especially large Thanksgiving dinner may in fact be a good spot to make a few connections for future business calls. Have some conversations, just don’t be that guy, Larry’s uncle who tried to sell everyone life insurance at Thanksgiving dinner. We’ve all been there and it’s not pretty.)

In the meantime, as America’s highly caloric opportunity to celebrate friends and family fills the house with the smell of roasting turkey and the sound of football on the new wide-screen plasma TV, here are a couple of useful hints on making the day less traumatic, especially with your elderly relatives.

Jason Gay at the Wall Street Journal offers a good list of foolproof and hopefully liability lawsuit-free suggestions for the pre- (or post-) dinner game of touch football, which I found quite helpful.

If you wonder what people in a totally different part of the world feel about America’s Thanksgiving customs—or how they look on in wonder and confusion, but would love it if they could attend—here’s a nice overview from the English language newspaper in Abu Dhabi, one of the United Arab Emirates. Sounds like they could really use some Thanksgiving traditions of their own.

Should you find yourself bored out of your mind by mid-dinner (or surrounded by tweens who are suffering from the same feelings, you could surf the web for these five key Thanksgiving related apps for your smartphone. The Black Friday one seems particularly useful; if you wonder where your clients are tomorrow morning, from midnight on, you’ll have a good idea.

Finally, if you haven’t actually begun the meal preparations yet, here are the definitive facts on how to make the Thanksgiving feast a safe experience for everyone in the family. The key word here is “cross contamination.”

That said, have a wonderful holiday (and an even more exciting shopping experience the next day) … and get back to business Monday.