You wore the badge around your neck, attended all the sessions, took notes, networked with others in your field, picked up 10 or 20 pounds of literature and handouts from the vendors, dined with new friends and listened to speakers present the latest information in your insurance world.

Then you got on the airplane and returned home. And threw the notes, brochures, convention books and handouts onto a shelf in the corner.

Herein lies the problem. After spending time and money to move forward in gaining important new information and techniques, why do we go home and forget what we learned?

It’s part of human nature. We have a sense that things are behind us. And we forget why we went to the convention, workshop or seminar in the first place.

Here’s my point: I suggest that you slot a three- or four-hour period some evening, or on a quiet Saturday morning, pick up the materials from the learning event, have a notepad handy, and reintroduce yourself to the items you found to be of most value. You will find that a whirlwind of four or five sessions in one day probably hop scotched you from one important concept to another, and that something you didn’t want to overlook has slipped your mind.

You’ll amaze yourself by rediscovering what you said, at the time, was going to be of value to you. And you’ll reinvigorate yourself with the event’s thoughts and ideas.

Editor’s Note: The preceding tip was taken from “Remember That Convention?,” a Sales Sizzler by Ronald J. Iverson that ran in the January 2006 issue of Life Insurance Selling.

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For more on professional education, see:

Online Learning: The Insurance Education Revolution

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