May 16, 2012

Renowned Planner Evensky Joins RMA Designation Board

‘Any practitioner, broker or RIA, who works in the field of retirement planning, would do well to enroll in’ RMA program, Evensky says

Renowned financial advisor Harold Evensky recently joined the Board of Governance for the retirement management analyst (RMA) designation program, a program that he says “any practitioner, broker or RIA, who works in the field of retirement planning, would do well to enroll in.”

The RMA program, which was designed by the Retirement Income Industry Association (RIIA), is designed for experienced practitioners who want to expand their professional knowledge with respect to the income distribution needs of retirees.

Harold EvenskyThe focus of the RMA program, Evensky (left) told AdvisorOne, “is well beyond the investment portfolio as it encompasses the client’s personal goals and needs, human capital, social capital, as well as financial capital.” It’s a “rigorous, academically based program,” he said, that is currently offered by three universities—Boston University’s Center for Professional Education, Texas Tech and Salem State University.

As a longtime planner and founder and president of Evensky & Katz, a wealth management firm based in Coral Gables, Fla., Evensky will help provide direction and oversight to the RIIA Advisory Education Business Unit. As RIIA explains, Evensky “will oversee development and enhancement of the RMA Code of Ethics and complaint adjudication process, serving also as a primary interface with regulators and the compliance community in connection with the RMA.”

Evensky told AdvisorOne that he joined the board “to continue to develop the quality of the educational [RMA] program, as I believe practitioners who have successfully completed that program and are committed to the strong ethics standards will be in a far better position to assist their clients in the complexities of retirement income planning.”

As to whether the RMA competes with other designations like the CFP, ChFC or CFA, Evensky says it’s “a complementary designation.”

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