February 16, 2012

Connors Group Launches Machine Advisor, a Web-Based Investment Tool

New software designed to help advisors reduce correlation in managed portfolios

A Machine Advisor sample advisor portfolio from the Connors Group A Machine Advisor sample advisor portfolio from the Connors Group

The Connors Group announced Thursday the launch of The Machine Advisor, a web-based investment-decision and marketing-support software that gives advisors a quantified and systematic approach to active investing, portfolio management and risk management.

With increasing investor uncertainty over traditional buy-and-hold methods, The Machine Advisor is designed to help advisors allocate assets to uncorrelated, actively managed investment strategies.

The tool's objective is to provide absolute returns without the use of leverage or derivatives. The software offers quantified and statistically validated investing models that have historically outperformed benchmark indexes.

Jim Lonergan, CEO, Connors Group“The Machine Advisor is an absolute game-changer for financial advisors looking for proven active investing strategies that will enhance the performance of their clients’ portfolios,” said Jim Lonergan (left), the new CEO of the Connors Group, in a statement. “Now, for the first time, advisors have at their fingertips a complete array of powerful tools and time-tested strategies that enable them to control and actively manage their client portfolios in literally just minutes a day.”

The software diversifies portfolios on four levels: strategy, time-horizon, long/short and asset class. The 28,000 active investing strategies within The Machine Advisor, developed by Connors Research over the past nine years, also provide buy and sell signals for U.S. equities and exchange traded funds.

Based in Jersey City, N.J., with offices in Los Angeles and Seattle, the Connors Group provides quantified market research for financial advisors seeking an active investing approach.

Read Bob Clark’s blog post Can Models Create the Low Correlations That the Markets Have Lost? at AdvisorOne.com

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