SEC's CIO Retiring to Pursue Ordination as a Deacon

Charles Boucher, head of IT for the SEC and a former Morgan Stanley executive, will also focus on non-profit work

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The SEC's chief information officer, Charles Boucher, is leaving the agency, after serving in this post since 2008, the SEC said July 12. Boucher plans to focus on non-profit work and religious studies as he prepares for ordination as a deacon.

As CIO, Boucher managed all of the SEC's information technology programs and systems. This included application development, infrastructure operations, enterprise architecture, security and user support - most notably the EDGAR system, which provides investors with access to millions of public company financial statements and other corporate filings.

"Effective securities regulation depends in large part on making sense of the immense volume of data generated in our securities markets," said SEC Chairman Mary L. Schapiro in a press release. "Charlie has played an important role in building a platform to implement our new system for reviewing complaints, tips and investigative leads provided by whistleblowers or other sources."

According to the SEC, Boucher led the agency's IT staff in the beginning of its efforts to revamp systems for reviewing tips, complaints, and referrals.

"I regard my time with the SEC as having been among the most important and rewarding of my career. It has been an honor to contribute during these challenging times, and to serve with people of the highest caliber," Boucher said in a statement. "Our country, and the world, benefit from the leadership this agency is providing to reform and better regulate our financial markets, so that they continue to expand economic opportunities for all people, and so that investors are protected."

Before coming to the SEC, Boucher was an executive director at Morgan Stanley and a senior vice president and CIO of Standard & Poor's. He also worked form Salomon Brothers and Chase Manhattan.

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