From the August 2009 issue of Research Magazine • Subscribe!

August 1, 2009

RJFS Advisor Shares Advice With Community During Hard Times

An Raymond James advisor offers seminars for the general public and partners with his wife, a clinical psychologist.

There's lots of talk these days about how advisors can best reach out and strengthen their reputations and businesses during the economic turmoil. Mitch Kauffman, CFP, of Raymond James Financial Services has developed a method that seems to work --- in good times as well as bad.

The Pasadena, Calif.-based advisor has been offering a series of seminars for the general public at Pasadena City College and at schools in Santa Barbara, Calif., too. He works in tandem with his wife, Joanne Moran, a clinical psychologist.

Their latest series, held in late April and early May, was entitled, "How to Survive an Economic Meltdown Both Emotionally and Financially." It included themes such as: how to succeed during the financial crisis, how to decide when you can afford to retire, how to get your savings to last through retirement, how to deal with financial and other forms of stress, what really makes us happy and how to shift emotional gears in our careers and relationships.

"People are really scared, primarily because they feel so out of control," says Moran. "We try to give them ideas and techniques for taking control where they can."

Kauffman, who has more than $100 million in assets under management, aims to help individuals "develop downside-protection strategies to stop further losses, establish stable cash flows from multiple sources for retirement, and make sure their portfolios are properly balanced so they can be in the best possible position to benefit from the recovery."

The couple offers these educational programs to the community and also to Kauffman's existing clients and their referrals. "We're working both fronts," he says. "And we really strive to help people get a balanced perspective on what's happening."

Reprints Discuss this story
This is where the comments go.