From the July 2007 issue of Investment Advisor • Subscribe!

Depression-Era Financial Reforms

More On Legal & Compliance

from The Advisor's Professional Library
  • Where Are We Headed? The ultimate compliance goal is to help ensure that everyone associated with an advisory firm acts ethically at all times.  Advisors and RIAs should do the right thing, even when regulators are not looking over their shoulders.
  • Agency and Principal Transactions In passing Section 206(3) of the Investment Advisers Act, Congress recognized that principal and agency transactions can be harmful to clients. Such transactions create the opportunity for RIAs to engage in self-dealing.
Glass-Steagall Act of 1933: Prohibited most securities activities by commercial banks. Separated commercial banking from investment banking.

Securities Act of 1933: Regulated the issuance of securities by requiring the registration of new offerings and the full disclosure of financial information.

Securities and Exchange Act of 1934: Established the Securities and Exchange Commission with broad authority to regulate the securities industry, markets, and trading.

Public Utility Holding Company Act of 1935: Enacted to address fraud, stock manipulation, and other abuses that had led to the collapse of major utility companies.

Maloney Act of 1938: Authorized self-regulatory organizations to police the securities industry under the direction of the SEC. Led to 1939 designation of the National Association of Securities Dealers as a self-regulatory organization for the securities industry.

Investment Company Act of 1940: Established regulatory framework for mutual funds, also known as investment companies or investment trusts. Required registration with the SEC and full disclosure of relevant information.

Investment Advisers Act of 1940: Required registration of investment advisers with the SEC and imposed antifraud provisions on their activities.

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