New Grassley Bill Would Require Hedge Fund Registration

Legislation seeks to overturn ruling exempting SEC registration

More On Legal & Compliance

from The Advisor's Professional Library
  • Conducting Due Diligence of Sub-Advisors and Third-Party Advisors Engaging in due-diligence of sub-advisors isn’t just a recommended best practice— it is part of the fiduciary obligation to a client. An RIA should be extremely reluctant to enter a relationship with a sub-advisor who claims the firm’s strategy is proprietary.
  • Client Commission Practices and Soft Dollars RIAs should always evaluate whether the products and services they receive from broker-dealers are appropriate. The SEC suggested that an RIA’s failure to stay within the scope of the Section 28(e) safe harbor may violate the advisor’s fiduciary duty to clients, so RIAs must evaluate their soft dollar relationships on a regular basis to ensure they are disclosed properly and that they do not negatively impact the best execution of clients’ transactions.

Senator Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa), the ranking Republican on the Senate Finance Committee, introduced the Hedge Fund Registration Act on May 15, legislation that would require hedge funds to register with the SEC. Grassley's bill comes on the heels of a D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals ruling last year that overturned the SEC's rule requiring such registration.

The Act "would enable the Securities and Exchange Commission to do what it was already trying to do," Grassley said in introducing the bill, and "gives members of Congress the opportunity to say there should be greater transparency with hedge funds."

Grassley surveyed federal agencies about hedge fund transparency last October. Earlier this year, he joined in requesting a review by the Government Accountability Office of the scope of public and private pension plan investments in hedge funds and what returns and risks are likely for worker retirement funds. In March, Grassley filed legislation similar to the legislation introduced today as an amendment to S.4, the 9-11 homeland security legislation.

Reprints Discuss this story
This is where the comments go.