From the October 2004 issue of Investment Advisor • Subscribe!

What's in a Name?

Junxure's history is a bit confusing because of its former association with Schwab Performance Technologies. Junxure got its start by signing an agreement to let Schwab market and support the program that Greg Friedman created for his planning business by hiring programmer Ken Golding. As part of their deal with Schwab, Friedman and Golding retained control of the software.

In 2002, Schwab announced it would stop selling new licenses to its portfolio management software and Junxure to advisors who were not Schwab custodial clients--a decision Schwab has since rescinded. But Friedman and Schwab split up. Schwab changed the name of its product recently to Schwab Portfolio Center Relationship Manager.

Friedman and Golding have released three new upgrades of their own version since splitting with Schwab. To distinguish their product from Schwab's version, Friedman called it Junxure-i for a short time, with the "i" suggesting that the product was for independent advisors using any custodian.

With Schwab Performance Technologies development staff tied up for the last three years converting its portfolio management software to an SQL database, the CRM software appears to have languished. Schwab has upgraded the code it bought from Friedman in 2000 to an SQL database and has revised the interface so that only only the most frequently used features are visible. It has improved alert settings and made some other minor changes to the program, but has not added many new features. Craig Carnick, one of about a dozen advisors participating in the demos of Junxure and ProTracker and a user of Schwab PortfolioCenter Client Relationship Manager, says ProTracker and Junxure provide more features and, at this point, are far better programs for advisors.

Reprints Discuss this story
This is where the comments go.